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What a wonderful account of life after disaster. Not only is she a survivor, but she is giving back to the biking community by sharing her knowledge and experience. As for me, I have broken a few bones from accidents when I was first learning but have now limited many of the situations in which I allow myself to ride: not in the dark, not with groups, I no longer follow other riders ... I always ride solo, and I always have a defensive frame of mind, always anticipating what a driver might do. I ride conservatively and don't take chances. My riding skills are good and they need to be, considering I ride in heavy city traffic plus on freeways. And yet, I know how quickly an accident can happen. Every time I read about an accident, I get as much info as I can about it and what I can learn from it. That's all I can do. I'm always learning, even after eleven years ... and I know that will never end.

Christine Jacobson
Everett, WA
Thursday, September 24, 2020
Editor Response
I like your thinking, Christine! You'd make a great RiderCoach—someone who understands there is always something to learn and improve upon. You know your own limitations and ride your own ride. These are wonderful qualities in a rider and coach or mentor.
Keep riding safe!
Tricia Szulewski, Editor
All the gear, all the time has been my mantra since I read about you about six years ago. I had to go from my two-wheeler to a three-wheeler and it is still my mantra! Thank you for sharing—it definitely made an impression on me and my fellow riders.


Penelope Gadd-Coster
Cloverdale, CA
Thursday, November 28, 2019
My husband was hit at 1pm October 20, 2018, when a mature lady made an illegal u-turn and hit him in the left leg, totaling his Harley-Davidson Road King and nearly him also. Similar story: Eight months in hospital, five weeks in rehab, disabled for life, and several rods and screws here and there. Eleven months later he's much better, still not ready to run any road races but looking forward to renewing his old 1988 FLTC to ride again.

Brittany I admire you so much! I admire all who struggle to regain a new normal and end up ultimately reinventing their life. Bless you, continue to inspire and teach! ATGATT, yepper!


Laurie Alexander
Tallahassee, FL
Tuesday, September 17, 2019
First of all, thank you to Brittany for sharing your story. Thank you for your courage and your willingness to turn a horrific circumstance into an opportunity. Recently my husband rode his motorcycle off the road and into a ditch, totaling the bike but thankfully only minimal damage to himself. He missed a telephone pole by inches. One of our favorite pastimes together was to ride. I own my dream bike, a Harley-Davidson Sportster SuperLow 1200T. Since he wrecked his, he no longer wants to ride and I'm now afraid to but I can't bring myself to sell my "girl." Would love your opinion and advice.

Pam
Redmond, OR
Thursday, October 4, 2018
Editor Response
I am relieved to hear that your husband only sustained minimal injuries. Although riding requires as certain amount of risk, it is never easy to accept the idea that something you love so much can cause pain to you and your loved ones. My advice to you is simple. Only you know what is in your heart. You must decide whether the joy of riding outweighs the potential consequences of a crash. Understanding and respecting the risk can make you a better, more cautious and focused rider. Fear can be debilitating and actually put you in harm's way. You must choose which of these you feel towards riding, and make an educated decision on the right course of action once you've identified whether you are truly afraid, or just more aware of the consequences now that you've experienced them secondhand. Whatever you choose, know that you are always part of our family of riders and nothing can take that away from you. I wish you and your family the best in life moving forward.
Brittany Morrow
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