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My husband and I have shared riding experiences with new riders. He will lead, the new rider or riders are in the middle, and I bring up the back. We have helped five people to become safer better riders in the last 10 years. Staying safe is important and sharing your knowledge is even better.

Lores
Charles Town, WV
Friday, April 6, 2018
There’s one hard and fast rule when it comes to the position of new riders in a group and that is that there is no hard and fast rule on where new riders should ride in a group. Before setting out on a group ride the newbies, participants, and rider leaders should discuss where they would be most comfortable—behind experienced riders learning from them, in front of experienced riders setting their own pace, or elsewhere. No one rule fits everyone.

Jon
Elmhurst, IL
Saturday, March 17, 2018
For everyone’s safety, new riders need ride in front on the right side of the lane with trailing rider behind and on left side of lane. In my lifetime of experience, too often I’ve been with a new or re-entry rider (on road after extended layoff) that have become distracted and not noticed what the lead rider was doing.

In one instance, I had faith in a buddy who got back into riding and I was leading the way to our destination. With my beautiful girlfriend riding behind me on a passenger pillion pad (no sissy bar) I initiated right hand turn sequence, blinker, hand signal and slowing to cornering speed. I heard the squeal of tires and my “experienced” buddy slid past me with zero room to spare doing a good 30mph faster than us. I dare not imagine what could have happened. This was a tremendous life lesson.

The perspective from behind allows the more advanced rider to evaluate the newer rider's technique, situational awareness, reaction sequence and overall skill sets. Hopefully, the more advanced rider can relay accurate and proficient expertise.

There are many advanced riding schools that cater to the newly licensed rider or those who could use refresher course—take your friend to one or suggest doing it with them. Even one learned lesson will make it worth it to the experienced rider. Plus, it will be fun to have the shared experience with your friend and you both can discuss your own take on the lessons provided.

We want you on the road and with as much knowledge as you gain experience.

Jay Bilmon
Naples, FL
Tuesday, March 13, 2018
At first I used to ride behind my husband who, of course, was the experienced rider. It was too distracting for him. His eyes were not on the road or paying attention like he should. One day I stopped on a hill at a traffic light. I stalled my motorcycle at this busy intersection and my bike was leaning. I was stuck there. I could not move.

My husband had continued on. By the time he realized I was not behind him I had already gingerly put my motorcycle on the ground. (I could not hold it any longer.) As the traffic piled up behind me. Two very nice gentlemen got out of their cars and helped me up right my motorcycle. They also gave me words of encouragement. From that day forward, I ride first. It is safer for my husband and now I am the "leader of the pack."

Susan DeFeo
Placida, FL
Tuesday, March 6, 2018
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