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Are you riding with anyone? You need to talk to someone who can explain to you the transilical forces of how that scooter your riding stays upright. Maybe you need to comprehend this better. The faster you're going the easier it is to handle that bike. You need to get someone to go with you and get you on some superslab where you're going to have to do the speed limit. After you have done your first 100 miles you will have relaxed and get it. Ride it like you stole it as they say.

FXD
Nomad, NY
Monday, April 9, 2018
I took the motorcycle safety course about 2.5 years ago. I have a Honda Rebel 250 and love it because I am only 5 feet 1 inch. I was not able to ride last summer due to back issues.

Now I'm ready to get back out except my biggest problem is when I am going about 50 mph and coming to where I need to slow down for the driveway and trying to figure out the speed to start downshifting.

Kim Newton
Mayville, NY
Tuesday, June 27, 2017
Editor Response
Hi Kim. I'm happy to hear your back is better so you can ride again.

Since the Rebel doesn't have a tachometer, you don't have the benefit of reading your bike's engine speed. Listen to your motorcycle for clues about when to shift. If you are "lugging" the engine, it sounds low and feels like it's about to stall. This means you are in too high of a gear and need to shift down. If the engine is whiny and high, you are in too low of a gear and need to shift up. Be careful to release the clutch easily and smoothly when downshifting, so that you don't accidentally lock up the rear tire if your choice of gear wasn't perfect.

Just keep practicing and you'll get it down in no time. The only way to get better at anything is to practice. Ride safe!
Tricia Szulewski, Assistant Editor
Hi fellow riders, I started riding at 50 years old on a Sportster 883. Since then, I have upgraded to a Heritage Softail. In my own experience, and most riders may agree, that "slow" riding is much more difficult and dangerous. Obviously stick to the speed limit but you will find that you have much better control while riding thus increasing your confidence. Take your speed up slowly to see how it feels. At all times safety first. Go for it.

Denise
Pretoria, South Africa
Tuesday, January 3, 2017
I've only got my left eye and was incredibly scared of making left hand corners because I couldn't see what was sneaking up on the right. I watched a group tear through corners, hills, and thought wth? If they can, I can too. My Indian is 111 and the men get drooling hot watching me, but the best part is I feel better knowing I can run as I want. Find the thought that helps you. Gang on to that thought till it's a habit


Candy
Nampa, ID
Monday, January 2, 2017
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