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New riders in Quebec have to follow a government-approved rider's course and then pass a theoretical and practical exam in order to get a restricted license.
They have to hold this license for a minimum of 9 months while riding with a buddy or accompanying rider.
We have no choice as the buddy rider must ride in front.
Then they have to retest on the road in order to get their permanent license.
We also have categories for the license; 6A being good for everything over 450cc. Although you are no longer forced to start with a smaller cc bike, in my opinion it's the best thing to do.
I am a 61-year-old woman who's been riding off and on since I was 16. I sold my old Yamaha Virago to a colleague at work and am now involved in being his buddy rider!


J. Willems
Montreal, Canada
Sunday, December 10, 2017
First before I address this question, a little history. I have been riding since 1999 (currently 51 years young) and currently have two bikes a Kaw 900 and 1500. I have been both a passenger and rider; enjoy being the rider best. I understand your partner wanting to keep an eye on you but unintentionally he may be pushing you and this can make the ride feel more like work. My husband wants to keep an eye on me even after all this time, just shows he loves you and wants to protect. Explain that by following behind him that you can follow his "line" through turns, he can warn you of obstacles and thus letting you take the ride at your pace not feeling pushed or that he might be grading your ride.

Yvette Wheeler
Savannah, GA
Thursday, November 10, 2016
I have been riding on and off for 30 years. During one of my off times my fiance told me she always wanted to learn to ride. We picked up a couple of Ninja 250s and away we went. I insisted she get her license though a motorcycle safety course, ad she did. We had the same problem though, she hated riding in front of me for the same reasons you stated. I hated riding in front of her because I couldn't see her. I honestly don't know who was more nervous me or her. Call it a "Mother Hen Syndrome."

My biggest problem was that I was spending way too much time watching my mirrors and not paying attention to the road ahead, which created a dangerous situation for both of us. I also had a hard time judging what a good pace for her was. I would hate for her to dump it in a corner that was too fast for her ability so we usually wound up going too slow. Then, "WE FOUND THE SOLUTION."

Bluetooth helmet communication. Being able to talk to each other while riding was like turning on a light switch in a dark room. Whether teaching or learning anything, communication is key. It eliminates the fear of the unknown. I ride front now and tell her about the pothole, gravel, guy on his cell not paying attention, etc. She tells me how she did in the last turn, if she got stuck at an intersection, or just "hey look at the pretty sunset." I can't say enough about how it has changed the way we ride.

We purchased them online.The brand name is Sena. They were about 250 for a two pack and very easy to install. They last all day and I even installed 12v outlets on the bikes in case we need to recharge them.

She also rides in front in areas she is familiar with and is much more comfortable doing so with me being able to coach from the rear. She is no longer wondering what I am thinking, she knows then and there.

Chris
Hopatcong, NJ
Sunday, February 15, 2015
Editor Response
Thanks for sharing your solution. For those readers interested, we've reviewed a leading helmet communication system, Cardo Scala Rider that can be read here.
Genevieve Schmitt, Editor
I got my license in July, so I know exactly what you're talking about. My husband also wanted me to ride in front. I hated it.

Being a newbie meant right turns were hair raising enough without worrying about cutting off my husband. I wasn't great at holding my line and I knew my husband was to my right and a length back. It just didn't work for me. It made me feel pressured and it distracted me.

Finally, I insisted that I ride in back... and what a difference! I learned far riding behind experienced riders than I did riding in front. I got to watch everything they did and emulate them.

I'm so glad that I started riding in the back, riding in the front was making it not as enjoyable.

So, I would say while riding in the front is a great idea, it doesn't work for everybody. Do what works for you.

Bobbi
Santee, CA
Tuesday, January 13, 2015
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