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Well, I just wanted to say love the articles but I have found as an experienced rider, from dirt bikes to street bikes (I ride sleds, four-wheelers, dirt, water, etc. and currently own a Kawasaki 600, Honda CBR 1000RR, and Harley Sportster) that it is only common for these bikes you listed as the most popular top ten beginner bikes to be popular because someone else recommended them as beginner bikes. They should be listed as city bikes top ten and suburban bikes top 10 and the ones your husband/boyfriend/partner didn’t pick out for you. I find it’s common that the Kawaski 300 is popular for beginners but the Kawaski 600 should be listed as the best beginner suburban bike for women; and the Sportster 883, not the Kawasaki 300. Problem is after you learn how to ride these bikes are not suitable; if you're going to spend a few thousand dollars get a bike you can learn on and then keep riding on, the bike you became comfortable on is always the best bike to ride that first few summers. Not purchasing the smaller bike then buying another and learning again.

I've heard guys complaining to the other men how he has to wait up for his partner—keep in mind he is riding a 600 or bigger but his partner is on a 300. It becomes frustrating and then causes issues. I see this on sled, motorcycles and other outdoor activities. In order to want to ride and to have a better time with the experience, don’t settle for what they say you should have—talk to a women rider like myself. I would tell you depending on your riding style and where you're riding what works. It’s different if you buy a bike to zip around a city and to work then to ride across state lines on an adventure with a group.

Kathi
South Hero, VT
Friday, April 6, 2018
Editor Response
We generally recommend small, lightweight, easy to handle motorcycles to learn on because it offers the safest, most confidence-inspiring way to learn. I've rarely heard riders complain they wasted their money on a small cc motorcycle to start with, as there is always a new rider ready to purchase it. Once you have outgrown the small bike, it's pretty easy to sell it and buy a larger motorcycle.

If you are riding with other riders who are not patient enough to wait for you without complaining, I recommend finding a new riding buddy.
Tricia Szulewski, Associate Editor
Sounds like Janice is on the wrong website. I love my four motos and my life has changed dramatically for the better since I started riding! I am present—there is no "what if" or "what was" when I ride. There is me and what is, right now. I am a much happier girl! I'd say this article fits me to a tee. Fortunately, my husband does not ride. It's a solo endeavor.




A of SB
Santa Carbara, CA
Friday, October 7, 2016
This article is ridiculous. It sounds like a feminine protection commercial written by a man. As a 37-year riding veteran, reading this only makes me think that you haven't got a clue why women ride. And Harley Davidson, the misogynist manufacturer that uses Marissa Miller, who doesn't even ride? Surveys? You clearly don't understand yourself. Riding doesn't make a woman have better sex, just more because it's a male fantasy, or she gets a new man. Riding can't make you happy, only you can. Get a grip.

Janice
Toronto, ON, Canada
Friday, June 26, 2015
I think you are absolutely right. I just bought my Harley Super Glide in June of this year and I can't keep myself away from it. I love it! It's in my blood. I can say I will never stop. I'm totally happy with my scoot.

Mary Big Medicine
Cedar Rapids, IA
Tuesday, July 22, 2014
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