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I also attended a motorcycle class and they taught us to downshift when slowing down and to stop in first gear. Why would you stop in second gear? Thank you for your articles keep them coming.

Adriene
Lakewood, CO
Thursday, May 14, 2015
Thanks for the refresher. I am sure that some will disagree with me, but I think that perception is the key to this. Looking forward, anticipating, being aware of your surroundings - all of this can change a tense, sudden (panic) stop into a controlled, slightly irratated stop. We like to complain about cage drivers on cell phones but riders fiddling with iPods or cell phones (particularly w/bluetooth capable helmets) or whatever technology (adjusting GPS on the run) that comes along are going to be increasingly to blame for accidents. I have always tried to tell my children that driving is a participant sport. Riding ups the ante exponentially. Be aware - ride safe.

Dave
Cincinnati, OH
Thursday, October 23, 2008
Breaking and stopping in a curve is one of the hardest things to learn. However, when I took a motorcycle safety course years ago, this was one of the things the instructors spent a lot of time teaching. They also taught the class to downshift and be in first gear when you stop. That way, if you need to move quickly to get out of the way of traffic, you are ready to take off and don't have to wait to put your bike in gear.

I highly recommend a certified safety course to everyone who mentions they are thinking about getting a bike. It is one of the most important things you can purchase as part of your "bike accessories."

Joann
Carlsbad, NM
Wednesday, July 30, 2008
I've read this advice before, but I can never read it often enough! I also practice "head talk" and don't just repeat the same old mantra of "people don't see motorcycles easily." Although true, I tell myself I am also part of the equation to make myself more visible and safe. And focus on every stop being a square, solid stop, leaving plenty of room between me an something bigger -- like a car or truck. And scanning ahead? I'm a much better car driver, too. My practice of scanning ahead while riding my motorcycle also transfers to my driving a car. Good reminder. Thank you for featuring this post!

Carol More
Chagrin Falls, OH
Tuesday, July 29, 2008
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